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The evolution
of marble in design

Light, hollow, and rounded. Marble overcomes technical constraints in order to unveil its transparency, its veins and its velvety sensuality. It inspires, it reveals, and it expresses itself. This is the evolution of marble… “To design objects and furniture using marble, making them as light as possible.” This is the latest challenge confronting contemporary designers. And the challenge has, in deed, been met, despite all technical constraints. Even though we continue to obsess over kilos, the visual effect is undeniably stunning. The stone of Carrara is being transformed into airy creations, seemingly freed from the laws of gravity. Marble has been turned into shelves, lamps, and dishes of incredible finesse, revealing the veins and the velvetiness of the material, whilst expressing all of its sensuality and its potential. By playing around with its texture and its transparency, designers are reinventing the ways of using marble. They are inspired by pieces of classic furniture, and then infuse these with a fantastical sense of creativity to create entirely new ones. Chairs, tables, and shelves adopt flexible forms, becoming rounded, even anthropomorphic. Even when using it for more conventional purposes, designers manage to transcend the limits of this material.





The evolution of marble in design

Béatrice Delamotte et Plume

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

Outdoor armchair Sunshare, carved by an machine sculptor with a laser using a single block of marble. It unfolds like a folded piece of paper. Ten copies available. From Emmanuel Babled Studio. © EBS. www.babled.net

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

A coffee table that reinterprets the wooden tray, Gazebo by Pierre Gonalons. Variable sizes, available on demand. From Ascète.©www.ascete.com

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

Movable shapes were used for this console “Cinderella Table”, created by a machine stone sculptor. It sculpted the block of marble from a 3D drawing, then it was polished by hand. The piece is ultra light and only 8mm thick. From the Demakersvan Collection at the “White Moon Gallery”, limited edition with 11 copies available on demand. Photo by Adrien Dirand.
 www.whitemoongallery.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

Lampe Flap by Cédric Rago. The same mass of mable was carved into in order to install a compact fluorescent lamp inside it. Limited edition with only 20 copies, all numbered and signed. © Bernard Maltaverne. Courtesy of Ymer & Malta.www.ymeretmalta.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

A combination of marble and mouth-blown Murano glass for this Simbiosi2 vase, from the Emmanuel Babled Studio – designed by Emmanuel Babled – photo by Edland Man.© Edland man. www.babled.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

Luminous, floating bookshelves. stillQuietplane by Benjamin Graindorge. Made from 2 types of marble, limited edition with only 8 copies, all numbered and signed. © Bernard Maltaverne. Courtesy of Ymer&Malta.www.ymeretmalta.com

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

An oversized ashtray for a dressing table by Philippe Pasqua, 50 cm in diameter. Tattooed by hand with several varieties of tattoos available. On demand. White Moon Gallery. Photo by Adrian Dirand.© Adrien Dirand www.whitemoongallery.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

The Paso Doble dining table by Studio Babled © EBS. Because of its legs, it resembles a spider and gives the impression of movement. A prototype. Designed by Emmanuel Babled, from the Emmanuel Babled Studio. Photo from EBS.www.babled.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

Pierre Gonalons transforms industrial scaffolding into a bookshelf, with ancient marble plaques, Edici. Limited to 30 copies, on demand. Ascète Gallery. ©www.nilufar.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

Pierre Gonalons transforms industrial scaffolding into a bookshelf, with ancient marble plaques, Edici. Limited to 30 copies, on demand. Ascète Gallery. © www.ascete.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mathieu Lehanneur transformed the chancel of Saint-Hilaire Church in Melle by elevating the height with beds of marble waves. They also wrap around the Romanesque columns. Photo © Felipe Ribon www.mathieulehanneur.fr

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

For the bottom of the baptismal font, the white marble creates a surface of uniform stone, formed by successive layers that are reminiscent of subsoil sedimentary formation.Photo © Felipe Ribon www.mathieulehanneur.fr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

This fixture is balancing game that can assume several positions and different angles of light. Made in three sizes and two types of marble. Limited edition with 20 copies available of each. A+A Cooren. © Bernard Maltaverne. Courtesy of Ymer&Malta.www.ymeretmalta.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

A feather measuring 1m50x3 cm by Luca Poli, made by hand. The artist wanted to play with the contrast between the lightness of the feather and the weight of marble. Avaialable on demand. White Moon Gallery.Photo © Adrien Dirand www.whitemoongallery.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

Pierced saucer by Normal Studio. Limited edition with 20 copies of each. A+A Cooren. © Bernard Maltaverne. Courtesy Ymer&Malta.www.ymeretmalta.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

The evolution of marble in design

Lightness was the aim for this Void stool created with the smallest possible mass of marble, and hollowed out as much as possible. Available in two types of marble. Limited edition with 20 copies of each. A+A Cooren. © Bernard Maltaverne. Courtesy Ymer&Malta. www.ymeretmalta.com

 

The evolution of marble in design

A vase by architect Mario Botta. Displayed for the first time in France at the White Moon Gallery, from the 25th of May to the 21st of July 2011. A unique piece. Photo © Mario Botta Architetto. www.whitemoongallery.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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